WAS THE ZODIAC MURDERS TARGETED AT THE CIA AND MILITARY

Richard Helms was head of the CIA and MK Ultra and phoenix programs

Was the CIA and Military targeted by the Family?

Charles manson biological father was Colonel  Walker Scott, it was rumored Charles Manson  was involved with the MK Ultra programs and also Phoenix programs through prison.

Was the murders of lake Berryassa and Paul Stine  a lashing out at the fact Manson had been arrested?

Was Manson programmed for this? so if there is more than one Zodiac killer could there have been CIA involvement .

Lake Berryassa was a hood like the CHurch of Satan and was wearing military wing walker shoes. maybe a reference to the military involvement with Church of Satan. Colonel Micheal Aquino( COS) and Colonel John b Alexander( non lethal weapons)

Paul Stine murder police sketch  Zodiac picture  looks like Richard Helm’s. Was a member of the Family dressed like him tho threaten him. There was a rumor that the  Tate la Bianca murders were a hit. Manson did not get the full amount of money.

was this a form of black mail? a threatening to expose the Military and CIA programs? A lashing out because Manson and family members had been arrested? Was there a military CIA connection?

Sharon Tate daughter of  LT Colonel Paul Tate high level intelligence CIA

Betty Lou Jensen father Lt Colonel Vern Jensen Navy

Darlene Ferrin father ex Marine  Darlene Ferrin’s ex-husband, James Phillips. military

Paul Stine killed within vicinity of U.S. Army base at Presidio. Paul Stine was a reporter for the military

http://www.theforbiddenknowledge.com/hardtruth/satanic_subversion.htm

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5 responses to “WAS THE ZODIAC MURDERS TARGETED AT THE CIA AND MILITARY

  1. SO if Paul Stine was a reporter in the military there is a good possibility there has been a cover up to hide the hit. I never bought the Police report that said that they were instructed that it was a Black man. Someone hid the truth to hide this. It has now been proven that the CIA was involved in the international drug trade. It has also been proven the Vallejo Police were covering up corrupt members who were in the drug trade. It was speculated that Paul Stine had been picking up fairs at the dock. Could he inadvertently picked up a package and figured out what was going on? He also was starting a Job as a reporter at the Chronicle. SO was this a professional hit? than was Darlene Ferrin a Hit too? interesting that Charles Manson worked with the Lucchese family…They did the Hits for the mafia. Maybe covering up the CIA’s involvement with drugs?

  2. The Zodiac signed his letters Z befor being dubbed the zodiac by the press,
    Z is a drug term for herion.After World War II, the Mafia took advantage of the weakness of the postwar Italian government and set up heroin labs in Sicily. The Mafia took advantage of Sicily’s location along the historic route opium took westward into Europe and the United States scale international heroin production effectively ended in China with the victory of the communists in the civil war in the late 1940s.[The elimination of Chinese production happened at the same time that Sicily’s role in the trade developed.
    Although it remained legal in some countries until after World War II, health risks, addiction, and widespread recreational use led most western countries to declare heroin a controlled substance by the latter half of the 20th century.
    In late 1960s and early 1970s, the CIA supported anti-Communist Chinese Nationalists settled near the Sino-Burmese border and Hmong tribesmen in Laos. This helped the development of the Golden Triangle opium production region.

    Drugs most likley played a big role in the Zodiac Murders. During the Vietnam war the military played a big role in the movement of herion to the United States. There seems to be a millitary connection to this case.

  3. Thomas Eugene Creech

    Charged with double homicide in Ada County, Idaho, in 1975, Tom Creech astounded his jailers by confessing to 42 murders, allegedly committed over thirteen states since 1967.

    In his statement, Creech alleged that many of the homicides were sacrifices ordered by a cult of Satanists; a biker gang reportedly commissioned others, sometimes paying Creech upon completion of a “contract.” Several jurisdictions airily dismissed the tales as fantasy, while others claimed that bodies had been found by following the prisoner’s directions.

    By October 1975, Creech was reliably linked with at least nine murders, including two in Idaho, two in Oregon, two in Nevada, and one each in the states of Arizona, California and Wyoming. Ironically, for all of his confessions, Creech denied the double murder which had led to his arrest in Idaho. Itinerant housepainters John Bradford and John Arnold were shot to death in Ada County after giving Creech a ride, but Creech professed that he had merely been a witness to the crime.

    His traveling companion, 18-year-old Carole Spaulding, had been charged as an accessory to murder in the case, but Creech named Spaulding’s teenaged sister — with a missing youth named “Danny” — as the killers.

    Members of his jury were unimpressed, and Creech was convicted on two counts of first degree murder on October 23, 1975. State law made the death penalty automatic, and he was formally sentenced to hang on March 25, 1976. Investigation of Creech’s confessions, meanwhile, listed his verified victims as Gordon Stanton and Charles Miller, killed near Las Vegas; Sandra Ramsamoog, 19, of Salem, Oregon; William Dean, in Portland, Oregon; Riogley McKenzie, murdered outside Baggs, Wyoming; Vivian Robinson, of Sacramento, California; and Paul Schrader, age 70, in Tucson, Arizona.

    Creech gave directions to alleged Satanic ritual sites near San Diego, Seattle, and Missoula, Montana, but authorities describe the solid evidence as negative in each case. As with Henry Lucas a decade later, many of Creech’s confessions remain impossible to verify or disprove.

    Prisoner Kills Fellow Inmate

    Fourteen Years Later, His Appeals Still Thrive

    June 6, 1995

    In 1975, Thomas Eugene Creech was convicted of first degree murder in the deaths of Edward T. Arnold and John W. Bradford and was sentenced to death.

    Four years later, on the basis of the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in Woodson v. North Carolina, 428 U.S. 280 (1976), the Idaho Supreme Court held that the statute under which Creech had been sentenced was unconstitutional because it provided for a mandatory death penalty. Creech’s sentence was commuted to life imprisonment.

    Thomas Creech is a serial killer. He has admitted to killing or participating in the killing of at least 26 people. The bodies of 11 of his victims — who were shot, stabbed, beaten, or strangled to death — have been recovered in seven states.

    In 1981, while serving his life sentence in prison, Creech killed again. Creech was an inmate of the Idaho State Correctional Institution. The victim, Dale Jensen, had been convicted of car theft and was in the same institution.

    Some years earlier, Jensen had been shot in the head which had necessitated the removal of part of his brain and the placement of a plastic plate in his skull. His speech and motor functions were somewhat impaired.

    Both Creech and Jensen were housed in maximum security where ordinarily only one inmate at a time was allowed out of his cell. Creech, however, had been made a janitor, and while performing his cleaning duties he was allowed to be out of his cell while another inmate also was out.

    Creech and Jensen were not on good terms. They had argued over television and over Jensen’s littering, which Creech, as a janitor, particularly resented.

    The circumstances surrounding Jensen’s death are unclear because Creech has given different accounts. It appears that on the day of the murder, Jensen approached Creech and swung a weapon at him. The weapon consisted of a sock containing batteries.

    Creech took the weapon away from Jensen, who returned to his cell but emerged with a razor blade taped to a toothbrush. Jensen made some movement toward Creech, who then struck Jensen between the eyes with the battery laden sock, knocking Jensen to the floor.

    According to Creech’s version (he being the only witness), Jensen swung at him with the razorblade, and he hit Jensen with the battery-filled sock. The plate in Jensen’s skull was shattered, and blood from Jensen’s skull splashed on the floor and walls. When Jensen was helpless, Creech kicked him about the throat and head. Sometime later, a guard found Jensen who was taken to the hospital where he died the same day.

    Over the objections of his counsel, Creech pleaded guilty to first degree murder. At the sentencing hearing, testimony was offered by both the state and the defense on Creech’s mental condition. The district court did not expressly rule on Creech’s sanity, but he did rule that Creech was of adequate intelligence and capable of being trained and educated.

    After the sentencing hearing, the judge found (as a mitigating factor) that Creech “did not instigate the fight with the victim” and that Creech “was initially justified in protecting himself.”

    However, the judge also found (as aggravating factors) that, “[the victim, once the attack commenced, was under the complete domination and control of the defendant” and that “[the murder itself was extremely gruesome evidencing an excessive violent rage.” The violence “went well beyond self-defense” and “appears to have been an intentional, calculated act.”

    The judge sentenced Creech to death, saying he “intentionally destroyed another human being at a time when he was completely helpless. “After a couple of appeals and petitions in the Idaho courts and an unsuccessful petition to the United States Supreme Court, in 1985 Creech filed a habeas petition with the federal district court.

    The court denied the petition. Creech went to the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, and in 1991 the Court of Appeals held part of the Idaho death penalty statute unconstitutional. The court also found two other defects in the original sentencing. In 1993, the U.S. Supreme Court reversed the court of appeals and upheld the Idaho statute but did not consider the other aspects of the 9th Circuit’s holding. The case was returned to the Idaho courts .

  4. The Manson file.

    There is way too much information to share, but I’ll let you know some of the changes to what we already know. I am just saying what is in the book. These are not my words!

    Hinman – It was all about recouping the $$ for the bad mescaline. The Straight Satan’s were the ones that forces Bobby into this. Bobby did not call Charlie, Mary did. If that call was not made, it is doubtful that Hinman would have been killed.

    April 1969 – Tex and Bruce botched a robbery (of drugs of course) at the apt of Joel Rosteau and his girlfriend Charlene Cafritz. Rosteau ended up getting shot in the foot. The police got involved and found drugs all over his place. Rosteau‘s attorney, Paul Caruso made it go away. Why is the name Caruso important?? He was also the attorney for Billy Doyle, Harrigan and Pic Dawson. He was also the law partner of Richard Caballero, Sadie’s first lawyer. Hmmmmmmm

    Somewhere in the books on the case, Linda is quoted as saying to Sadie, “Remember that thousand dollars I had? I got burned up in the hills on some bad MDA”. Who burned her? Billy Doyle.

    Aug 8 1969 – Rosteau makes a delivery of $20,000 worth of cocaine and mescaline to Jay at Cielo Drive. A large amount of LSD was also expected, however the LSD supplier (who owned a dress shop) was out of town till the next day. Rosemary‘s name is never mentioned, but it would have to be her..

    Later that night, Tex and the girls go to Cielo with the intention of robbing Jay of his drugs. When he learns the LSD is not there, a fight breaks out and they end up dead. It reads that two of them were tied up, and the others killed. When Charlie and friend returned later, the other 2 were killed.

    The LaBianca killings – This is a tough one. The book doesn’t even settle this. There are theories mentioned, some we’ve heard before. Yes Leno had had mob connections. The Genovese family is mentioned many times in the book. When The Beach Boys manger, Grillo(?) told Charlie, “I’ll call New York”!, he actually called Leno. This came from Grillo’s secretary.

    Remember in Little Paul’s book where he talked about a mob lawyer putting him up in a hotel and questioning him??

    Did Rosemary deal LSD? No credible source was ever found. But how did she accumulate an estate over 2 million dollars in 1969? Her store sold wigs. Tex sold wigs. Important? Maybe, I don’t know.

    If Leno was in debt to the mob for $200,000, why didn’t Rosemary cover it?

    Was it a robbery? Maybe, the safe was empty and Bruce took off for England with Leno’s coins.

    The Labianca’s had a drug dealer neighbor whose name was Quartermain. He was the boyfriend of the mother of one of the Murdered Scientologists., Doreen Gaul or James Sharp. He ran in the same circles as Rosteau. That was the reason for those murders.

    There is way too much information to share in this forum. If you spent the $100 for “Death to Pigs”, there is no reason not to buy this. The Process is hardly mentioned at all. The whole Mafia, Catholic Church, Italian Bugliosi issued is explained in detail. It is best to have a pad and pen nearby as there are many facts you will want to write down. Porno movies, gay sex and kiddie porn discussed in great detail. (Altobelli and Charlie gobbled each other’s knobs a few times). Peter Lawford, the Kennedy’s, Marilyn Monroe, it’s all here!

    Some facts I remember:

    Joel Rosteau Sebring’s dealer – Mafia
    Both LaBiancas – Mafia
    Candy Stevens (Charlie’s 2nd wife) – Mafia
    Candy took the alias “Leona” after one of her clients (Leno!)
    Gary Hinman was an FBI Informant
    The Straight Satan’s were Mob connected
    Manson meets Dennis Wilson at Gary Hinman’s house during a drug buy, not at his house. The whole hitch-hiking story was a cover-up.

    This one caught my eye:

    The prosecution offered Charlie a deal, 18 years in jail, if he testified against Tex and co. He refused.

    The book is not entirely pro-Manson. Some of the theories are a little far fetched. But so was “Helter Skelter” for that matter!